Architecture Styles of Houses in Cincinnati

Posted By on June 30, 2012

There are quite a number of architecture styles for houses in Cincinnati that you can choose from depending on your taste and style. You can decide to use a combination of styles or use only one style in your house; which is simply known as vernacular houses since they do not require an architect to design. Houses in Cincinnati are built from a variety of styles that have been borrowed from different parts of the country and reached Cincinnati to fashion the houses there. It is generally possible to date a house within 20 years by identifying its style, but not always.

With the improvement in transportation methods in the 1840s with the first use of railways and train brought a significant change in the architecture in house in Cincinnati. Railway transportation made it possible to import building materials from other parts of the country to Cincinnati; and the result during this time was that the granite and marble houses were used in the construction of more elaborate homes. These houses were stronger and more durable than the log cabins. They also brought a new face to the city of Cincinnati as they replaced the common old logged cabins.

Queen Anne is an architecture that originated from England and was used around 1880- 1900 and it included combination of wood and brick as the major building material in this style. Queen Anne is the style that represents “Victorian” to many people. These houses have windows designed in different styles and have high chimneys made of bricks. When electric streetcars expanded popular neighborhoods like Northside, Avondale, Walnut Hills and Clifton were developed with a large number of Queen Anne style homes.

The Tudor revival is another architecture that was used and came in all sizes depending on a family’s taste and size requirement. Houses made using this style were made of timber and bricks; the bricks were only used to fill the space between the timbers but sometimes they were left exposed. They were made with casement windows with flexible hinges on the outside and diamond shaped window panes. The 20th Century brought the automobile to Cincinnati and the result was street after street of Colonial Revival, Bungalow and Tudor Revival houses.

These are just a few of the architectural styles that are represented in the houses in Cincinnati. The common thread is that most of them originated in other parts of the country and reached Cincinnati a few years later and that transportation was a key in the evolution of new styles.

At Potterhill Homes, we are proud of the architectural styles of our homes. In fact, we like to think of our homes as having unique architecture and we include distinct architectural styles from a bygone era. Check out our website at www.PotterhillHomes.com to see for yourself.

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About the author

As the people behind Potterhill Homes, we have some pretty strong feelings about energy efficiency and green building. And we don't always agree! But we are commited to building a best homes we can and bringing you along on our journey to figure out exactly what that means! Thanks for checking out our site. My Google Profile+

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About Potterhill Homes

Cincinnati-based Potterhill Homes is a premier builder of affordable, environmentally friendly homes in Greater Cincinnati. Our homes are built with traditional Cincinnati architectural styles and are perfect for both urban infill and suburban development. To learn more about Potterhill Homes,visit www.potterhillhomes.com.


About the authors

As the people behind Potterhill Homes, we have some pretty strong feelings about energy efficiency and green building. And we don't always agree! But we are commited to building a best homes we can and bringing you along on our journey to figure out exactly what that means! Thanks for checking out our site. My Google Profile+